Packard 2-38 Phaeton

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Keywords: 1914 packard series 2-38 six, packard series 2-38 six information, packard series 2-38 six history, thirty-eight, six, model 38, packard cars
Description: The Packard Series 2-38 Six (1914); Also known as: Thirty-eight, Six, Model 38. Packard Company was very successful with the production of its early four-cylinder cars and by 1912 it began production of the six-cylinder range. A total of 14 different body styles were offered, including this Phaeton. Packard owners could also choose from over 40 different paint styles in a range

James Ward Winton purchased a single-cylinder Winton in 1899. Unsatisfied with his purchase, he approached Mr. Winton to discuss his complaints. Mr. Winton's response was that if Mr. Packard could make a better product, then he should do so. Within a decade, Packard had become a major automaker, offering a broad range of models aimed at the luxury market.

The 1914 Packard 1-38 series was a continuation of the 1912-1913 'First 38 Series,' or 'Dominant Six,' as it was known internally. The list of body styles was all encompassing, from a short 114-inch three-passenger Runabout to a seven-passenger limousine on a 138-inch wheelbase. The bodies were constructed from aluminum over white ash framing. Power was provided by a 415 cubic-inch inline six-cylinder L-head engine offering 60 horsepower. It had seven main bearings and its cylinders cast-in-pairs. Electrics were 6 volts; ignition was jump-spark by Bosch dual magneto. All had a multi-plate dry-disc clutch linking to a rear-mounted sliding-straight-cut gear transaxle with three speeds plus reverse.

In 1914, Packard introduced many features on the 1-38, including a Delco electric starting system, left-hand steering, and a centralized unit on the steering column to control ignition, lighting, horn, and carburetor mixture.

The Packard 1-38 were the company's lowest-cost automobiles at the time, and were priced between $4,050 and $5,400 (a considerable price at the time).

This Packard 5-passenger phaeton was once part of the Richard Paine Collection in Seal Cove, Maine. Ownership later passed to the Matt Browning Collection in Ogden, Utah, as part of multi-car trade. The Packard was treated to a professional restoration that included fabrication of all-new aluminum fenders, new paint, extensive replating of the brightwork, and six new demountable rims.

Prior to the restoration work being completed, Mr. Browning passed away and his family retrieved the partially assembled Phaeton. It was sent to Clyde Wade, former Director and General Manager of the William F. Harrah Automobile Collection in Reno, Nevada, for completion. The car was later sold by Mr. Browning's estate at the Christie's Monterey auction in 2000 to the current owner. The new owner sent the car to marque specialist Bob Mosier at Mosier Restorations in Inglewood, California, for freshening.

This is a matching numbers 1914 Packard that is finished in black and olive green with black fenders, belting, chassis and running gear. Inside is black button-tufted long-grain leather upholstery. There is a black top, wooden artillery wheels with demountable rims, and twin spares.

James Ward Packard purchased a 1898 Winton, but found it to have several shortcomings. After expressing his dissatisfaction with the vehicle, Winton suggested that Packard should try his hand at building a motorcar. Soon, Mr. Packard has his own company. Four cars were built its first year and 47 of a new 'Model B' in 1900.

On September 10, 1900, James Packard and his brother William had formed the Ohio Automobile Company in their hometown of Warren, Ohio. In 1902, the firm became known as the Packard Motor Car Company. In 1903, it moved to Detroit, where a very large modern concrete factory designed by industrial architect Albert Kahn was being built.

In 1902, Packard built two and four-cylinder cars, but it was a single-cylinder car that bettered Winton's coast-to-coast record in 1903, with driver Tom Fetch in 'Old Pacific.' Other notable Packard competition included the Vanderbilt Cup Races and sand racing at Ormond Beach in Florida.

In 1907, Packard introduced the Model 30, helping to establish Packard was one of the premiere builders of luxury cars.

In April of 1911, Packard introduced its first six, a very large 525 cubic-inch T-head. It was designated the Model 48 for its rated horsepower. The engine developed 74 bhp at 1720 RPM and Packard advertised that it would achieve '60 miles per hour in 30 seconds from a standing start.' A Bosch dual ignition system was used, along with Packard's unique float-feed carburetor with automatic mixture control. Prices started at $5,000 and ranged upward to $6,550. There were thirteen body styles available on wheelbases that ranged from 121.5 to 139 inches. The car was an instant success, with 1,350 examples sold in its first year of production.

Packard introduced a smaller six, the Model 38, in December of 1912. The engine had an L-head design with cylinders cast in pairs, and displaced 415 cubic-inches, had seven main bearings and developed 60 bhp. The Model 38 was Packard's first car to have left-hand drive and electric starting, the latter from a Delco starter-generator of the type developed by Charles Kettering. The electrical system had a control unit attached to the steering column. This design was the work of chief engineer Jesse Vincent, who would later design the Twin Six and Liberty aircraft engines. The control unit had switches for the ignition, lights and horn, an ignition lock and mixture control for the carburetor.

The Model 38 sold for $4,050 to $5,400. Most of the 13 body styles had a 134-inch platform. The Phaeton and Brougham styles rested on a 138 inch chassis while the runabout and two coupes had a shorter, 115.5-inch frame. The Touring was the most popular Model 38 bodystyle, and the only one to open style on the intermediate wheelbase. The other intermediate cars were the limousine, Landaulets, and 'Cabette.'

In 1913, there were over 1600 examples of the Model 38 (latterly called the '1-38' or '1338') were constructed and nearly 700 '2-38s' in 1914. This overwhelming success convinced Packard to drop their line of four-cylinder cars.

For 1915, Pacakrd produced the 3-38 Six, which featured in an increase of five horsepower. The company offered the car in two-dozen bodystyles all riding on a 140-inch platform. The 3-38 was sold along size the 5-48 for 1915. Total production for 1915 was 360 vehicles.



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